Record of obtaining a Japanese residence card after the period of stay has been updated

I’m a little hesitant to write this article. It seems to have no value, but I don’t know why I want to write it. There is exactly one hour left before the next trip. After finishing the work at hand at a nearby coffee shop, let’s simply record it. I went to the Tokyo Immigration Bureau in the morning and waited for more than 2 hours to get the latest residence card. After various changes during the epidemic, this is the first time I have updated my Japanese residence card in the past four years. To be honest, I have a little bit of expectation. I hope that the period of my residence card will be at least 3 years, so that I don’t have to deal with the renewal procedures every year. When I got the updated residence card, I saw that the period was set at 3 years, and I breathed a sigh of relief. At least this period was quite satisfactory. With my residence card in hand, I rushed to the Ueno Ward Office. Because, the Mynumber card (equivalent to China’s ID card) needs to be updated simultaneously. After filling out the application information, I waited for about an hour, and the validity period was synchronized on the Mynumber card. Later, you need to arrange another time to go to the bank to renew the residence card period, otherwise the bank card may not be used normally. When applying for the renewal of residence card this time, Chinese characters and pinyin were specially added to the name. Because the last residence card only had name information in Pinyin, my seal (Chinese characters) could not be used, so I went out of my way to reapply for a seal and seal certificate. With the two languages ​​of Pinyin and Chinese characters, the personal seal can be in Pinyin or Chinese characters. These may be small things, but in order to work and live normally in Japan, you need to handle them as required, otherwise unexpected things will happen, causing inconvenience to your work and life. Just write this much. . . .